(via Strib)

It’s been more than a decade since “Amy,” as she’s known in court papers, was first sexually abused by her uncle. The abuse ended long ago and he’s in prison, but the pictures he made when she was 8 or 9 are among the most widely circulated child pornography images online.

Should Amy get paid for the images that she claims hurt her every time they are viewed?

In Minnesota last month, a federal judge ordered prosecutors to explain why they didn’t ask for restitution in a case involving images of Amy.

A number of victims across the country have come forward seeking restitution from people who were caught with videos and pictures of their abuse. Now, judges are trying to figure out whether someone who obtains a picture taken years ago is directly responsible for the harm suffered by the victim. If the answer is yes, judges have the added complication of figuring out what amount is justified.